What are the benefits of an Epsom salt detox? Epsom salt can be added to a warm bath or foot soak to provide a variety of benefits, including soothing the skin, reducing stress, and relieving pain. In this article, we look at the evidence behind the benefits, how to make an Epsom salt detox bath, and whether there are any risks to consider when using Epsom salt. Read now
Not into green tea? Try sipping on dandelion root tea, sometimes called dandelion coffee, which is caffeine-free and tastes somewhat similar to actual coffee. Dandelion is famous for its cleansing properties, and one study found that it helped rid the body of reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress, which reduced risk of atherosclerosis (deposits of plaque within arteries). Dandelion greens are great too, as they can help stimulate bile production and promote healthy digestion.
Eating a healthy diet doesn’t have to be overly complicated. While some specific foods or nutrients have been shown to have a beneficial effect on mood, it’s your overall dietary pattern that is most important. The cornerstone of a healthy diet pattern should be to replace processed food with real food whenever possible. Eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it can make a huge difference to the way you think, look, and feel.
Such superciliousness doesn’t wash with Nigella Lawson. In a recent interview, she dismissed the current trend for ‘clean eating’ as a fad. “I love kale and I’m an avocado obsessive,” the domestic goddess told Good Housekeeping magazine. “But life is about balance, it’s not about being smug. You don’t eat things because you think they’re good for you.”

They say too much information is a dangerous thing, but in the case of consumers, access to information is helping reshape how they are living their lives. This shift in preference for healthy, natural products and the eschewing of artificial chemicals, sweeteners, sugar and other synthetics in all aspects of our lives is one of the basic building blocks for Tematica Research’s Clean Living investing theme
Calcium. As well as leading to osteoporosis, not getting enough calcium in your diet can also contribute to anxiety, depression, and sleep difficulties. Whatever your age or gender, it’s vital to include calcium-rich foods in your diet, limit those that deplete calcium, and get enough magnesium and vitamins D and K to help calcium do its job. Learn more »
You don't have to hunt and skin your supper, but if your chicken has been molded into a nugget, who knows what you're really chewing. And when you choose meat that's been processed into sausage, strips or slices, you're downing sodium and preservatives instead of healthy nutrients, says Adam Drewnowski, Ph.D., director of the nutritional sciences program at the University of Washington at Seattle. Stick to unfussed-with cuts straight from the butcher.
Gastrointestinal issues will create or exacerbate a faulty detoxification system. Improving your digestive system requires removing obstacles that create dysbiosis (gut imbalances) and other problems, but also incorporating the right gut-supporting foods and nutrients. Talk to your chiropractor or other healthcare professional if you suspect intestinal permeability (leaky gut) or other digestive problems.
For a 2,000-calorie daily diet, aim for 2½ cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit a day. If you consume more calories, aim for more produce; if you consume fewer calories, you can eat less. Include green, orange, red, blue/purple, and yellow vegetables and fruits. In addition to the fiber, the nutrients and phytochemicals in these foods may help protect against certain types of cancer and other diseases. Legumes, rich in fiber, can count as vegetables (though they have more calories than most vegetables). For more fiber, choose whole fruits over juice.

These foods—notably vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains—should supply about 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. (Aim for 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories, as advised by the  Dietary Guidelines for Americans.) Fiber slows the absorption of carbohydrates, so they have less effect on insulin and blood sugar, and it provides other health benefits. Try to fill three-quarters of your plate with produce, legumes, and whole grains—leaving only one-quarter for meat, poultry, or other protein sources.
Challenge yourself to come up with two or three dinners that can be put together without going to the store—utilizing things in your pantry, freezer, and spice rack. A delicious dinner of whole grain pasta with a quick tomato sauce or a quick and easy black bean quesadilla on a whole wheat flour tortilla (among endless other recipes) could act as your go-to meal when you are just too busy to shop or cook.

You are what you eat! What you eat can affect every aspect of your health, so make sure you’re eating the good stuff. You can learn more about clean eating from our blog series here, but, in a nutshell, clean eating means eating a diet of whole, organic and unprocessed foods – you know, real food. Avoid things with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.
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