In comparison, scores on the Alternate Healthy Eating Index created at the Harvard School of Public Health did appear to correlate more closely with better health in both sexes. Men with high scores (those whose diets most closely followed the Healthy Eating Pyramid guidelines) were 20 percent less likely to have developed a major chronic disease than those with low scores. Women with high scores lowered their overall risk by 11 percent. Men whose diets most closely followed the Healthy Eating Pyramid lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease by almost 40 percent; women with high scores lowered their risk by almost 30 percent.

The term "detox diet" is broad, divisive, and often conjures thoughts of cleanses featuring cayenne-laced lemon water that promise to curb cravings, boost energy, and help you lose weight. Many people are quick to say they’re all a hoax, too, since the body is more than capable of taking care of itself, thanks to our built-in detoxification system starring the liver.
Depending on who you ask, the detox diet meaning can vary pretty widely. For some, it may be considered an intense cleansing diet that consists of drinking strange concoctions for weeks on end to clear out toxins and achieve weight loss. For others, the term “detox cleanse” is little more than a marketing ploy used to shill expensive and overpriced products to health-conscious consumers.
We are seeing yet another shift in consumer products at the intersection of our Clean Living and Disruptive Innovators investing themes wherein the world’s biggest consumer brands are looking to provide their products to consumers in refillable containers so as to reduce waste. This creates a tailwind behind those providing the containers and the refilling […]

Your tip When you detox, you define eating as unhealthy and starvation as virtuous. Instead of depriving yourself as a ritual, focus on each bite and appreciate its health benefits. "I've started keeping nuts and fruit near me when I work, and I'm taking breaks to sit down and eat," Kai says. "Not only do I like eating more, but [I'm] also getting some quiet time."
On a related note, if you’re thinking “I’ll just put less food on my plate” … it’s not that simple. The picture below explains why. When you eat a small portion off of a large plate, your mind feels unsatisfied. Meanwhile, the same portion will feel more filling when eaten off of a small plate. The circles in the image below are the same size, but your brain (and stomach) doesn’t view them that way.
In our increasingly modern and fast-paced world focusing on lives of convenience, our health is suffering. Obesity, heart disease and cancer rates have skyrocketed. Couples struggle with infertility and children struggle with serious behavior issues at younger and younger ages.  We’ve all heard the old line, “Must be something in the water.” Well, it’s become more like there must be something in everything.
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