Usually, lawsuits end in a settlement, with an empirical analysis finding that less than 2% of cases end with a trial.[9] It is sometimes said that 95% of cases end in settlement; few jurisdictions report settlements, but empirical analysis suggests that the settlement rate varies by type of lawsuit, with torts settling around 90% of the time and overall civil cases settling 50% of the time; other cases end due to default judgment, lack of a valid claim, and other reasons.[9]

Rule 606 of SEC Regulation NMS requires broker-dealers receiving non-directed client orders to publicly disclose, on a quarterly basis, the top execution venues to which such orders are routed for execution. Broker-dealers also must disclose material aspects of the relationships they maintain with the identified execution venues. The Rule 606 statistics for Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated are available for public review by clicking here.
The recall and precision rates of these searches vary depending on the implementation and searches analyzed. One study found a basic boolean search's recall rate to be roughly 20%, and its precision rate to be roughly 79%.[3] Another study implemented a generic search (that is, not designed for legal uses) and found a recall rate of 56% and a precision rate of 72% among legal professionals. Both numbers increased when searches were run by non-legal professionals, to a 68% recall rate and 77% precision rate. This is likely explained because of the use of complex legal terms by the legal professionals.[12]

A lawsuit may involve dispute resolution of private law issues between individuals, business entities or non-profit organizations. A lawsuit may also enable the state to be treated as if it were a private party in a civil case, as plaintiff, or defendant regarding an injury, or may provide the state with a civil cause of action to enforce certain laws.
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